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Desktop Photography


Starting around 1990, one of the things that pushed my interest in computer hardware was the idea of seeing photographic quality imaging on my computer. Over the years, it lead to the purchase of numerous graphic cards, computer monitors, and eventually various digital cameras - all in pursuit of digital imaging technology.

Olympus D320L
The first digital camera I ever bought was in 1997. By any measure, the Olympus D320L was a cutting-edge camera for its time. At 1.0 megapixel resolution, and supporting removable SmartMedia flash memory, the D320L set the standard for its class.

Olympus C2000 Zoom
Summer of 1999, I replaced the point-n-shoot with an Olympus C2000 Zoom. This was a 2.1 megapixel camera, with high speed cache, a 3X optical zoom lens, aperture size & shutter speed control, an infrared remote, and absolutely stunning image quality (for 1999). The C2000 Zoom was one of the first "pro-sumer" digital cameras on the market.


Canon PowerShot S100 Digital Elph
Fall of 2000, I bought my wife this Canon Digital Elph. Also known as the PowerShot S100, this 2.1 megapixel camera was the smallest digital camera on the market. We bought it for point-n-shoot, in-your-purse convenience. It was freakishly small (for 2000).

Canon PowerShot G3
Summer of 2004, I bought the Canon G3. This is a 4 megapixel camera with a 4x optical zoom lens. It uses Compact Flash, like Gail's Elph, but has more buttons, controls and features than I'll likely ever use. Mostly, I bought the camera for its image quality, which is outstanding when matched with Canon's external flash attachment.

Canon PowerShot A720 IS
Seven years after we bought Gail's Canon Elph, the little guy finally bit the dust. In Fall of 2007, we replaced it with the new Canon A720 IS.  This is an 8 magapixel camera, with a 6X optical zoom, face-recognition and image stabilization.  The picture quality and features are truly amazing, and at only one third the price of her old Elph. Technology marches on.


Every now and then, I managed to take a pretty decent photo. And of course image quality will always look somewhat lacking in the hind-sight that comes with improved technology, the pictures themselves are still OK. So below are some of my better shots. Click on any of the pictures here - they each link to a 1024x768 version of the smaller image.




Cobbs Hill Reservoir (194k)
Cobbs Hill Reservoir


Glenora Winery (375k)
Glenora Winery


Siests Key, Florida (252k)
Siesta Key, Florida

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia (258k)
Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia (226k)
Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia

Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia (226k)
Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia

Capital Building (296k)
Capital Building

Whitehouse (377k)
The Whitehouse

Washington, DC (514k)
Washington, DC

Ceasars Palace, Las Vegas (418k)
Ceasars Palace, Las Vegas

Paris Hotel, Las Vegas (399k)
Paris Hotel, Las Vegas

New York New York, Las Vegas (431k)
New York NY, Las Vegas

Niagara Falls (314k)
Niagara Falls

Gilbert's Cove, Nova Scotia (267k)
Gilbert's Cove, Nova Scotia

High Falls (185k)
High Falls District

Lake Ontario (194k)
Lake Ontario

Alexander Street Bridge (169k)
Alexander Street Bridge

White Springs Manor (232k)
White Springs Manor

George Eastman House (249k)
George Eastman House

Southwick Zoo, MA. (283k)
Southwick Zoo, MA

Southwick Zoo, MA. (249k)
Southwick Zoo, MA

Inside Passage, Alaska (176k)
Inside Passage, Alaska

Tracy Arm Fiord, Alaska (168k)
Tracy Arm Fiord, Alaska

Exit Glacier Park, Alaska (227k)
Exit Glacier Park, Alaska

Mohonk Mountain House (296k)
Mohonk Mountain House

Mohonk Mountain House (303k)
Mohonk Mountain House

Mohonk Mountain House (302k)
Mohonk Mountain House